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!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC “-//W3C//DTD XHTML+RDFa 1.0//EN” “http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/DTD/xhtml-rdfa-1.dtd”> Animals in India have, through the ages, been part of life and custom whether in battle or for ceremonial purposes, in royal processions, at festivities, rituals and worship, and in the everyday life of pastoralists, agriculturists and others who have depended on their animals for work, life and sustenance. In the past the range of crafts specially designed and commissioned for their use by courts and the nobility included bespoke fitted armour and weaponry, glittering caparisoning, trappings and other decorative and utilitarian accessories. Among the more humble and domestic traditions of utilitarian adornment is the continuing, though endangered tradition of braiding camel girth-belts, locally called tang in the dessert region of Thar in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan.In this hot and water-scarce region, the camel has for centuries played a significant role in the life of the people — in combat, in trade, in agriculture and as a significant means of transportation. Its milk remains an important dietary source, while its hair and hide serve myriad purposes....

Ageless Iron: IHC Overcomes Huge Obstacles to Introduce First Cotton Picker

Some of the most daunting engineering challenges in agriculture often did not involve tractors. Fashioning harvesting implements that could successfully pluck crops clean from their plants drove engineers into deep thought and often despair in their search for a eureka moment. In that regard, one of the most difficult of all harvesting implements to perfect was the cotton picker.  Consider that the first patent granted on a mechanical cotton harvester was issued in 1850. Yet, it would take nearly 100 years for the first commercial picker to be introduced. It would take the largest equipment builder of it day, IHC, employing some of the most talented engineers of the time to make the picker a reality. International’s interest in cotton harvesters harks back to one of its founding members, Deering Harvester Company, which put a picker in the field in 1889. The heart of that machine was a spindle-type drum that plucked cotton from its bolls, leaving husks behind on plants. After Deering and McCormick merged to create IHC, work continued on a spindle picker. One of the company’s engineers, E.A. Johnston, conceived of a design using vacuum action to remove bolls, but that effort fai...